Project: AFI 100 Movies

AFI 100 MOVIES
2007 Version

1. Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
2. The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
3. Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
4. Raging Bull (1980, Martin Scorsese)
5. Singin’ in the Rain (1952, Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly)
6. Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
7. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
8. Schindler’s List (1993, Steven Spielberg)
9. Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)
10. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming)
11. City Lights (1931, Charles Chaplin)
12. The Searchers (1956, John Ford)
13. Star Wars (1977, George Lucas)
14. Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock)
15. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
16. Sunset Blvd. (1950, Billy Wilder)
17. The Graduate (1967, Mike Nichols)
18. The General (1926, Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman)
19. On the Waterfront (1954, Elia Kazan)
20. It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
21. Chinatown (1974, Roman Polanski)
22. Some Like It Hot (1959, Billy Wilder)
23. The Grapes of Wrath (1940, John Ford)
24. E.T. the Extra Terrestrial (1982, Steven Spielberg)
25. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962, Robert Mulligan)
26. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, Frank Capra)
27. High Noon (1952, Fred Zinnemann)
28. All About Eve (1950, Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
29. Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)
30. Apocalypse Now (1979, Francis Ford Coppola)
31. The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston)
32. The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)
33. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975, Milos Forman)
34. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937, David Hand)
35. Annie Hall (1977, Woody Allen)
36. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, David Lean)
37. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, William Wyler)
38. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948, John Huston)
39. Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964, Stanley Kubrick)
40. The Sound of Music (1965, Robert Wise)
41. King Kong (1933, Merian C. Cooper & Ernest B. Schoedsack)
42. Bonnie and Clyde (1967, Arthur Penn)
43. Midnight Cowboy (1969, John Schlesinger)
44. The Philadelphia Story (1940, George Cukor)
45. Shane (1953, George Stevens)
46. It Happened One Night (1934, Frank Capra)
47. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, Elia Kazan)
48. Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)
49. Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffth)
50. Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001, Peter Jackson)
51. West Side Story (1961, Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins)
52. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese)
53. The Deer Hunter (1978, Michael Cimino)
54. MASH (1970, Robert Altman)
55. North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock)
56. Jaws (1975, Steven Spielberg)
57. Rocky (1976, John G. Avildsen)
58. The Gold Rush (1925, Charles Chaplin)
59. Nashville (1975, Robert Altman)
60. Duck Soup (1933, Leo McCarey)
61. Sullivan’s Travels (1941, Preston Sturges)
62. American Graffiti (1973, George Lucas)
63. Cabaret (1972, Bob Fosse)
64. Network (1976, Sidney Lumet)
65. The African Queen (1951, John Huston)
66. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Steven Spielberg)
67. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, Mike Nichols)
68. Unforgiven (1992, Clint Eastwood)
69. Tootsie (1982, Sydney Pollack)
70. A Clockwork Orange (1971, Stanley Kubrick)
71. Saving Private Ryan (1998, Steven Spielberg)
72. The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
73. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969, George Roy Hill)
74. The Silence of the Lambs (1991, Jonathan Demme)
75. In the Heat of the Night (1967, Norman Jewison)
76. Forrest Gump (1994, Robert Zemeckis)
77. All the President’s Men (1976, Alan J. Pakula)
78. Modern Times (1936, Charles Chaplin)
79. The Wild Bunch (1969, Sam Peckinpah)
80. The Apartment (1960, Billy Wilder)
81. Spartacus (1960, Stanley Kubrick)
82. Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
83. Titanic (1997, James Cameron)
84. Easy Rider (1969, Dennis Hopper)
85. A Night at the Opera (1935, Sam Wood)
86. Platoon (1986, Oliver Stone)
87. 12 Angry Men (1957, Sidney Lumet)
88. Bringing Up Baby (1938, Howard Hawks)
89. The Sixth Sense (1999, M. Night Shyamalan)
90. Swing Time (1936, George Stevens)
91. Sophie’s Choice (1982, Alan J. Pakula)
92. Goodfellas (1990, Martin Scorsese)
93. The French Connection (1971, William Friedkin)
94. Pulp Fiction (1994, Quentin Tarantino)
95. The Last Picture Show (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)
96. Do the Right Thing (1989, Spike Lee)
97. Blade Runner (1982, Ridley Scott)
98. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942, Michael Curtiz)
99. Toy Story (1995, John Lasseter)
100. Ben-Hur (1959, William Wyler)
1997 Version
Doctor Zhivago (1965, David Lean)
The Birth of a Nation (1915, D.W. Griffith)
From Here to Eternity (1953, Fred Zinnemann)
Amadeus (1984, Milos Forman)
All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, Lewis Milestone)
The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
Fantasia (1940, Walt Disney [prod])
Rebel without a Cause (1955, Nicholas Ray)
Stagecoach (1939, John Ford)
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, Steven Spielberg)
The Manchurian Candidate (1962, John Frankenheimer)
An American in Paris (1951, Vincente Minnelli)
Wuthering Heights (1939, William Wyler)
Dances with Wolves (1990, Kevin Costner)
Giant (1956, George Stevens)
Fargo (1996, Joel Coen)
Mutiny on the Bounty (1935, Frank Lloyd)
Frankenstein (1931, James Whale)
Patton (1970, Franklin J. Schaffner)
The Jazz Singer (1927, Alan Crosland)
My Fair Lady (1964, George Cukor)
A Place in the Sun (1951, George Stevens)
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967, Stanley Kramer)

This is addressed on the Projects page linked above, but just so we’re clear: I don’t actually believe that the American Film Institute is some sort of authority on what makes a Great American Film. Polls, of critics or the public, in general are problematic, and certainly less interesting than the non-groupthinked lists of individual people. But I maintain that there is some function to these lists anyway, in this case because it gave me an outline — the list doesn’t contain every artistically or commercially major American movie or anything close, but it does make for a strong beginning to such a canon. Like all lists of its kind, it’s a place to start. It was the project with which this blog began, and with which it now ends its first two years of existence. It’s a decent list less for the value of the films it encompasses than for the way that it variously touches on most of the crucial branches of U.S. cinematic culture — more cynically, it was a good way to build up this blog’s content very easily and simply, since all of the films are so easy to find!

More than any other list, the AFI covers big bold cultural touchstones — the movies that, you know, you’re just supposed to love. Some you actually can come to love or already do, some are so massive and so ingrained in the culture it’s kind of hard, some are so massive and so ingrained in the culture it’s hard not to. The top ten alone is divided sharply between films that have virtually shaped my perception of art, culture and the movies, and films that are diametrically opposed to my ideas about those things. I tend to assume most would have the same reaction to the list as a whole, just with different films, and one of the reasons I started doing things like this to begin with is the liberation one feels when one realizes they are permitted to make these cultural touchstones their own — or, as the case may be, to reject them outright. Having an informed opinion, one way or another, is marvelously subversive.

Some readers may be aware that this blog is a reboot of sorts. I used to review films as part of my personal diary-like blog and when it became clear that unstructured catching of whatever happened to be airing on TV on a given evening was not exactly opening the world up to me, I started doing list projects. I completed the AFI list the first time in a period of about a year between 2006 and 2007. The difference then was that I skipped all of the films I had seen before, which cut the time down dramatically. Additionally, in the year that I was in the midst of filling in the gaps, the institute fully revised the list for its tenth anniversary, with nearly a quarter of it rotated — thus prolonging my pursuit. At the time, a few of the films were still rather difficult to see; The African Queen was in rights limbo at the time and hadn’t yet received its restoration and DVD release, and The Jazz Singer was out of circulation for a time, but eventually I located an old TV dub of the former and Warner Bros. got the lead out with a lavish home video release of the latter. It’s significant, though, that the reputation of The Jazz Singer slipped dramatically enough in that ten-year period that it was gone from the list by the time of the revision.

This time around, of course, I went by the 2007 version of the list and waited until afterward to gather up the 23 leftovers from the ’97 rendition, figuring that the newer list is a more satisfactory vision of the popular and mainstream critical taste as it stands now. (In comparing the two, you’ll notice a strong correction of the lean toward then-contemporary favorites like Fargo and Dances with Wolves, though I have a suspicion that the meriting of the first Lord of the Rings film with a #50 slot will seem equally bizarre as time goes on.) The other, more obvious, difference this time is that I watched every single one of the films, and watched every minute of them! And each was, yes, accompanied by a long or at least sort of long review. It goes without saying that this means there’s essentially no comparison — in 2006, I was just performing a quick rehearsal for this much more extensive runthrough.

One thing that I may as well mention is that the AFI project, while the first of a whole whole lot of lists and regimens to be tackled at this blog, is likely the only time that every film referenced on a given list will receive a full-length review here. Even at their worst, these films are still mostly relevant and bear extensive thought and rumination, and even those I find it hardest to talk about — Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, say — would make the collection of writeups here seem weak and incomplete if they were absent. So I’ll be enjoying all those bright white links up above and accepting that it’s probably the only time one will look so pleasantly busy and aligned!

Now for the boring stats. Feel free to skip, but I’d like to record them here. #1 on the AFI list is Citizen Kane, with which I inaugurated the blog in advance of a thirteen-week series of reviews of new-ish films. I watched it as a special one-off thing on December 29, 2011 in order to get a review posted three days later (hard for me to imagine that now that I’m watching movies about a week in advance of writing at length about them and four to five months in advance of posting the results), but I didn’t start the AFI 100 in earnest until February 23, 2012 with a viewing of The Godfather. I finished the main 100 with Toy Story on May 2, 2013 and completed the 1997 remainder pile and thus the project as a whole with a tortured revisit of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner on August 1, 2013. I was finished writing the reviews by mid-August — a number of them were revisions of things I’d written on my first pass at this — but because of my warring impulses of perfectionism and sloppiness, I didn’t stop tweaking any of them until their appearances here, so it’s only this week that I am truly free of the AFI and its control over my life and viewing habits!

Of course, while this list has some things I don’t really enjoy on it, as they all are bound to, it was generally a very fun project and an instructive chance to really dive headfirst into the acknowledged, undisputed classics of Hollywood from all eras. Any excuse to watch movies like Kane, Vertigo, Gone with the Wind and Network is a good one — and I’m pleased to have finally had the chance to write passionately and directly about them, something that in the case especially of the Hitchcock films I had lazily put off for years and years, unsure that I had the strength, wit or intelligence to tackle them. I’m still unsure of that but I forced it anyway!

So the total number of movies on both lists is 123. I had seen them all previously; there were some that I hadn’t screened in more than ten years, but none that were actually new to me. Having said that, I’d regret it if I didn’t note that I was introduced to three of my all-time favorite movies (The Best Years of Our Lives, Singin’ in the Rain and Sunrise) by the AFI 100 project the first time around, and of course that alone would justify the headaches and heartaches.

The posting of the reviews for the AFI project has, of course, overlapped with three concurrent projects at the blog — the investigations of the Academy Award winners for Best Picture, Director and Screenplay. In total, a whopping 55 films that appear on either AFI list won one or more of those three Oscars. (That’s 42 on the 2007 list, 13 of the 23 left off.) That encompasses 37 Best Picture winners (including 10 of the castaways). For Best Director, the number goes up to 40, but if we only count the films that did not also win for Best Picture, it drops to 7. The Screenplay category is somewhat irrelevant here because we’d only reached the ’30s by the time the AFI project finished (in both viewing and posting terms), but in case you desperately want to know, 36 films on the AFI list were honored with writing-related Oscars. As with any such overlap, the films were screened wherever they appeared first. If #3 on the AFI list won Best Picture in the ’80s, it probably was screened with the AFI stuff first. If #77 on the AFI list won in 1944, chances are it was reviewed with the Oscar stuff. In the end, this makes very little difference to the integrity of the project, but it’s noted here just so there’s no confusion.

Because the AFI poll is just a compendium of opinions without much real-world meaning (sorry, but it’s true), it would strike me as rather meaningless to rank the 123 films therein listed. But I have to bore you with something, so here’s a list of the films that made the poll that I agree are among the 100 best American films (that I know of). (I’m not addressing the ranking of the films on the actual list because that would seem like completely pointless hair-splitting to me at this point in my life. But There Was a Time…)

1. Citizen Kane (1941, Orson Welles)
3. Casablanca (1942, Michael Curtiz)
5. Singin’ in the Rain (1952, Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly)
6. Gone with the Wind (1939, Victor Fleming)
8. Schindler’s List (1993, Steven Spielberg)
9. Vertigo (1958, Alfred Hitchcock)
10. The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming)
11. City Lights (1931, Charles Chaplin)
14. Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock)
15. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
16. Sunset Blvd. (1950, Billy Wilder)
17. The Graduate (1967, Mike Nichols)
21. Chinatown (1974, Roman Polanski)
28. All About Eve (1950, Joseph L. Mankiewicz)
29. Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)
34. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937, David Hand)
35. Annie Hall (1977, Woody Allen)
37. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946, William Wyler)
38. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948, John Huston)
39. Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964, Stanley Kubrick)
46. It Happened One Night (1934, Frank Capra)
48. Rear Window (1954, Alfred Hitchcock)
55. North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock)
56. Jaws (1975, Steven Spielberg)
61. Sullivan’s Travels (1941, Preston Sturges)
64. Network (1976, Sidney Lumet)
74. The Silence of the Lambs (1991, Jonathan Demme)
77. All the President’s Men (1976, Alan J. Pakula)
80. The Apartment (1960, Billy Wilder)
82. Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
88. Bringing Up Baby (1938, Howard Hawks)
93. The French Connection (1971, William Friedkin)
95. The Last Picture Show (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)
1997 Version
All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, Lewis Milestone)
The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed) [but it’s not actually an American film, so…]
Fantasia (1940, various)
Rebel without a Cause (1955, Nicholas Ray)
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, Steven Spielberg)
The Manchurian Candidate (1962, John Frankenheimer)

On a slightly lower tier, these are the films that I wouldn’t quite call “great” — though in several cases, I wouldn’t be surprised if I came around next time — but I don’t flinch for even a second at their placement on the AFI.

12. The Searchers (1956, John Ford)
18. The General (1926, Buster Keaton & Clyde Bruckman)
20. It’s a Wonderful Life (1946, Frank Capra)
22. Some Like It Hot (1959, Billy Wilder)
26. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, Frank Capra)
31. The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston)
36. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957, David Lean)
41. King Kong (1933, Merian C. Cooper & Ernest B. Schoedsack)
42. Bonnie and Clyde (1967, Arthur Penn)
43. Midnight Cowboy (1969, John Schlesinger)
58. The Gold Rush (1925, Charles Chaplin)
60. Duck Soup (1933, Leo McCarey)
66. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981, Steven Spielberg)
78. Modern Times (1936, Charles Chaplin)
85. A Night at the Opera (1935, Sam Wood)
90. Swing Time (1936, George Stevens)
96. Do the Right Thing (1989, Spike Lee)
1997 Version
Stagecoach (1939, John Ford)
Frankenstein (1931, James Whale)

Here are the AFI selections that I love — they’re a blast, they’re strong and interesting, I get a real kick out of them — but I instinctively just don’t feel that they really belong here. In other words, they’re movies I count as favorites but I do find them slightly overrated, and a bit out of their element in the company they keep on this list.

65. The African Queen (1951, John Huston)
83. Titanic (1997, James Cameron)
70. A Clockwork Orange (1971, Stanley Kubrick)
81. Spartacus (1960, Stanley Kubrick)
87. 12 Angry Men (1957, Sidney Lumet)
89. The Sixth Sense (1999, M. Night Shyamalan)
99. Toy Story (1995, John Lasseter)
1997 Version
Amadeus (1984, Milos Forman)
Fargo (1996, Joel Coen)
A Place in the Sun (1951, George Stevens)

Here’s where the contentious stuff starts. I understand why the following films are on the AFI list — I agree that they have remained culturally relevant — but I really don’t agree with their inclusion on it. None of these are movies I actively dislike; in fact, I enjoy some of them (about half) and just feel neutral and/or confused by the rest. But I wouldn’t go so far as to say they taint the list. I’d probably raise my eyebrow a little just like most folks if they were forgotten.

2. The Godfather (1972, Francis Ford Coppola)
19. On the Waterfront (1954, Elia Kazan)
23. The Grapes of Wrath (1940, John Ford)
24. E.T. the Extra Terrestrial (1982, Steven Spielberg)
30. Apocalypse Now (1979, Francis Ford Coppola)
32. The Godfather Part II (1974, Francis Ford Coppola)
33. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975, Milos Forman)
40. The Sound of Music (1965, Robert Wise)
44. The Philadelphia Story (1940, George Cukor)
45. Shane (1953, George Stevens)
47. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, Elia Kazan)
49. Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffth)
51. West Side Story (1961, Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins)
54. MASH (1970, Robert Altman)
59. Nashville (1975, Robert Altman)
63. Cabaret (1972, Bob Fosse)
67. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966, Mike Nichols)
68. Unforgiven (1992, Clint Eastwood)
72. The Shawshank Redemption (1994, Frank Darabont)
73. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969, George Roy Hill)
75. In the Heat of the Night (1967, Norman Jewison)
79. The Wild Bunch (1969, Sam Peckinpah)
91. Sophie’s Choice (1982, Alan J. Pakula)
92. Goodfellas (1990, Martin Scorsese)
98. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942, Michael Curtiz)
100. Ben-Hur (1959, William Wyler)
1997 Version
Doctor Zhivago (1965, David Lean)
From Here to Eternity (1953, Fred Zinnemann)
An American in Paris (1951, Vincente Minnelli)
Wuthering Heights (1939, William Wyler)
Mutiny on the Bounty (1935, Frank Lloyd)
Patton (1970, Franklin J. Schaffner)
The Jazz Singer (1927, Alan Crosland)

Here are the lonely dissents. I think these are actually bad movies. I again accept their cultural importance, but I bristle more than a little at their presence here.

4. Raging Bull (1980, Martin Scorsese)
7. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
13. Star Wars (1977, George Lucas)
25. To Kill a Mockingbird (1962, Robert Mulligan)
27. High Noon (1952, Fred Zinnemann)
50. Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001, Peter Jackson)
52. Taxi Driver (1976, Martin Scorsese)
57. Rocky (1976, John G. Avildsen)
62. American Graffiti (1973, George Lucas)
69. Tootsie (1982, Sydney Pollack)
71. Saving Private Ryan (1998, Steven Spielberg)
84. Easy Rider (1969, Dennis Hopper)
86. Platoon (1986, Oliver Stone)
97. Blade Runner (1982, Ridley Scott)
1997 Version
The Birth of a Nation (1915, D.W. Griffith)
Giant (1956, George Stevens)
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967, Stanley Kramer)

These films are in a class by themselves. They have absolutely no business being on a list of the best American films. They are true, honest dreck. A couple of them have no business being on any list. It was while watching these films that I truly detested working on this project. Enjoy!

53. The Deer Hunter (1978, Michael Cimino)
76. Forrest Gump (1994, Robert Zemeckis)
94. Pulp Fiction (1994, Quentin Tarantino)
1997 Version
Dances with Wolves (1990, Kevin Costner)
My Fair Lady (1964, George Cukor)

***

More for my own benefit than anything, this is a very simplified list of movies screened for this project about which I found that my feelings had changed — some a little, some a hell of a lot. The plus or minus signs indicate the number of “grades” by which the film jumped or sank.

Major upswings:
West Side Story (+++)
the Sound of Music (++)
Midnight Cowboy (++) [Likely the most pleasant surprise from this project: a film I’d long dismissed becoming a favorite.]
the Philadelphia Story (++)
Wuthering Heights (++) [This didn’t feel like major anything, because it really isn’t anything special, but I had grossly and somewhat bizarrely rated the film as an absolute disaster before. Not sure what I was thinking.]

Minor upticks:
the Searchers (+)
In the Heat of the Night (+)
Bonnie and Clyde (+)
Patton (+)
the French Connection (+)
Rocky (+)
the Gold Rush (+)
American Graffiti (+)
Titanic (+)
Shakespeare in Love (+)
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (+)
Easy Rider (+)
Goodfellas (+)
Stagecoach (+)

Decline and failure (all slight changes, but some made the stark leap from “mediocre” to “bad”):
Raging Bull (-)
On the Waterfront (-)
Some Like It Hot (-)
An American in Paris (-)
To Kill a Mockingbird (-)
One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (-)
Intolerance (-)
MASH (-)
Cabaret (-)
Forrest Gump (-)
Tootsie (-)
the Shawshank Redemption (-)
Giant (-)
Doctor Zhivago (-)

List of films that I strongly wish had not been removed from the older version of the list:
All Quiet on the Western Front (1930, Lewis Milestone)
The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed) [again, though, almost certainly this was outvoted because it’s a British film]
Fantasia (1940, various)
Rebel Without a Cause (1955, Nicholas Ray)
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977, Steven Spielberg)
The Manchurian Candidate (1962, John Frankenheimer)

List of films whose addition to the new version of the list I find strongly objectionable:
Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001, Peter Jackson)
Saving Private Ryan (1998, Steven Spielberg)
Blade Runner (1982, Ridley Scott)

List of films that fully deserved removal from the old version of the list:
The Birth of a Nation (1915, D.W. Griffith)
Dances with Wolves (1990, Kevin Costner)
Giant (1956, George Stevens)
My Fair Lady (1964, George Cukor)
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967, Stanley Kramer)

List of films that fully deserved addition to the new version of the list:
Sullivan’s Travels (1941, Preston Sturges)
All the President’s Men (1976, Alan J. Pakula)
Sunrise (1927, F.W. Murnau)
The Last Picture Show (1971, Peter Bogdanovich)

***

You definitely didn’t ask, but based on the star ratings I give at Letterboxd, the AFI 100 averages out to about 3.63/5 stars, about a B+ or thereabouts. Pretty good! Include the castaways and that decreases slightly to 3.58, which I figure is still a B+.

So, pulling all this together: I’m really proud to have finished this and I think it gives this blog a sort of cornerstone from which to operate in the future. Don’t think it can be said that we’re not at least somewhat serious about what we’re doing, even if it’s still a ramshackle one-man operation. The AFI does important work, most of it nothing to do with lists, but I actually do hope that in 2017 they perform another poll, in which case we will probably get about 20 to 25 further new titles to ensure we’ve got covered here. If one of them is Out of Africa, I dunno what I’ll do. (But fear not; it won’t be.)

Our next project here — already in progress in my DVD player and Netflix account for some months now — is the ever-changing IMDB Top 250. A lot of the AFI 100 shows up on that list and will of course be skipped over unless I really want to watch something again (in which case I may revise something in an old review, but don’t tell anyone). The first unexplored film from that project will appear here later this week, with a current-ish version of the list showing up on the projects page next Sunday. Thanks for reading, have fun, and if you’re a Star Wars fan, please forgive me!

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